explore-blog:

22 years ago today, the first photo was uploaded to the web – and it was of an all-girl science rock band from CERN, singing about colliders, quarks, and antimatter.

Oh, and they were actually really, really good.

// HA! oh internet, you so funny

Artist: Cristopher Cichoki - Land Spore (Desert Reserve) 2011

(via replek)

explore-blog:

A wonderful 1992 conversation with the great Leonard Cohen on creative process, hard work, and the dignity of song.

// music has buoyed me up in so many storms

ineedaguide:

photography by miss aniela

// dreamy ineedaguide:

photography by miss aniela

// dreamy ineedaguide:

photography by miss aniela

// dreamy ineedaguide:

photography by miss aniela

// dreamy ineedaguide:

photography by miss aniela

// dreamy
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

// WE LIVE IN THE FUTURE

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

// WE LIVE IN THE FUTURE

(via proofmathisbeautiful)

explore-blog:

Swami Vivekananda on the secret of work — a beautiful and ever-timely read from1896, intelligent consolation for the pressures of our age of productivity

// that’s what’s on my mind grapes

itscolossal:

LIKE / Mister Thoms

// bang-on for 2k14 & reminds me of a song that Sean Orr made with his band Taxes way back in ?2007 about social media & our ubiquitous need for affirmation

// WUMP WUMP WUMP
// serpentine
mymodernmet:

Ukraine-based artist Denis Gonchar’s dynamic series Flying Birds captures the essence of birds in flight.

// the application of angularity works surprisingly well! mymodernmet:

Ukraine-based artist Denis Gonchar’s dynamic series Flying Birds captures the essence of birds in flight.

// the application of angularity works surprisingly well! mymodernmet:

Ukraine-based artist Denis Gonchar’s dynamic series Flying Birds captures the essence of birds in flight.

// the application of angularity works surprisingly well! mymodernmet:

Ukraine-based artist Denis Gonchar’s dynamic series Flying Birds captures the essence of birds in flight.

// the application of angularity works surprisingly well! mymodernmet:

Ukraine-based artist Denis Gonchar’s dynamic series Flying Birds captures the essence of birds in flight.

// the application of angularity works surprisingly well! mymodernmet:

Ukraine-based artist Denis Gonchar’s dynamic series Flying Birds captures the essence of birds in flight.

// the application of angularity works surprisingly well!

mymodernmet:

Ukraine-based artist Denis Gonchar’s dynamic series Flying Birds captures the essence of birds in flight.

// the application of angularity works surprisingly well!

(via staceythinx)

// haha! whoa… what kinda world are these kids gonna create?!

(via doubleflipped)

oarv:

Edward Scissorhands (1990); dir. by Tim Burton

// Burton at his finest? oarv:

Edward Scissorhands (1990); dir. by Tim Burton

// Burton at his finest?

oarv:

Edward Scissorhands (1990); dir. by Tim Burton

// Burton at his finest?

(via dermatographia)