April 23, 2014
"

You speak English, a futured language, and what that means is that every time you discuss the future or any kind of a future event, grammatically, you’re forced to cleave that from the present and treat it as if it’s something viscerally different. Now suppose that that visceral difference makes you suddenly disassociate the future from the present every time you speak. If that’s true, and it makes the future feel like something more distant and more different from the present, that’s going to make it harder to save.

If, on the other hand, you speak a futureless language, the present and the future, you speak about them identically. If that suddenly nudges you to feel about them identically, that’s going to make it easier to save.

[…]

Futureless language speakers, even after this level of control, are 30 percent more likely to report having saved in any given year. Does this have cumulative effects? Yes. By the time they retire, futureless language speakers, holding constant their income, are going to retire with 25 percent more in savings.

Can we push this data even further? Yes. Think about smoking, for example. Smoking is, in some deep sense, negative savings, right. If savings is current pain in exchange for future pleasure, smoking is just the opposite. It’s current pleasure in exchange for future pain. What we should expect then is the opposite effect. And that’s exactly what we find. Futureless-language speakers are 20 to 24 percent less likely to be smoking at any given in time compared to identical families. And they’re going to be 13 to 70 percent less likely to be obese by the time they retire.

"

In a fascinating episode of NPR’s TED Radio Hour titled The Money Paradox, behavioral economist Keith Chen shares some absolutely astounding research on how the tenses in a language influence that culture’s attitudes about saving and spending money.

Complement with this excellent, albeit flawed by virtue of being written in the futured English language, read on how to worry less about money.

The full TED Radio Hour is well worth a listen.

(via explore-blog)

Fascinating!

April 23, 2014
bahamvt:

Salvador Dali – Ménagère (Cutlery Set) 1957

bahamvt:

Salvador Dali – Ménagère (Cutlery Set) 1957

(Source: aarcadien, via dermatographia)

April 23, 2014

jtotheizzoe:

awkwardsituationist:

photos of butterfly and moth wings taken by linden gledhil at seven to ten times life size.

"evolution is written on the wings of butterflies" - charles darwin

Seeing the microscopic wonder that is a butterfly’s wing always makes me think of Vladimir Nabokov, author and lepidopterist (and not necessarily in that order).

You’ll want to check out Nabokov’s butterfly sketches, whimsical fantasy species presented as gifts to his wife. And don’t miss his gorgeous butterfly-inspired poem, “On Discovering a Butterfly”.

Finally, don’t miss this great video from Smarter Every Day in which Destin goes full microscope on some butterfly scales. Beautiful stuff:

(via staceythinx)

April 22, 2014
kittenmeats:

“At the End of the Rainbow” (1946)

kittenmeats:

At the End of the Rainbow (1946)

(via illustratedanatomy)

April 22, 2014
replek:

om

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replek:

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2:30pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZSa3Fv1Dq4bOF
  
Filed under: om 
April 22, 2014
"Love is bitter and all there is… the rest is for the emotional beggars of the earth."

Zelda Fitzgerald, who married F. Scott on this April 3,1920, on their turbulent love in an extraordinary letter (via explore-blog)

April 22, 2014
(via magdalena jetelova)

(via magdalena jetelova)

April 21, 2014

archatlas:

Wild Concrete Romain Jacquet-Lagreze

"Wild Concrete is a photographic series focusing on a very singular phenomenon happening in Hong Kong. Usually wherever human beings are thriving, they always try to keep in control of their direct environment. But in this bustling city, trees can grow impressively on residential buildings. They are the proof that our control is not ever-lasting and they show us how this very loss of control can bring true beauty. Wild Concrete is about nature taking back, it is a demonstration of the tenacity of life in our urban environment."

(via staceythinx)

April 21, 2014
visitheworld:

The western terrace at Nemrut Dağı, eastern Turkey (by richard0428).

Finally! These are featured in a haunting time-lapse shot in the beautiful film Samsara & I wondered where they are until now. Thanks Igor!

visitheworld:

The western terrace at Nemrut Dağı, eastern Turkey (by richard0428).

Finally! These are featured in a haunting time-lapse shot in the beautiful film Samsara & I wondered where they are until now. Thanks Igor!

(via replek)

April 21, 2014

itscolossal:

For the last 10 years contemporary artist Rachel Sussman has researched, collaborated with biologists, and traveled to the far reaches of the planet to photograph the oldest living things before they disappear.

Beautiful, Radical, Awe-full

check the link for the ages of the photos’ subjects (wow)

April 20, 2014
"I can choose either to be a victim of the world or an adventurer in search of treasure. It’s all a question of how I view my life."

Paulo Coelho (via thepaintedbench)

(via replek)

April 20, 2014
takesocietycamping:

“Like a Japanese Cowboy…”

Ween - Japanese Cowboy from 12 Golden Country Greats

takesocietycamping:

Like a Japanese Cowboy…”

Ween - Japanese Cowboy from 12 Golden Country Greats

(via replek)

April 20, 2014

Animal Anatomy + Kinesiology

  1. Horse
  2. Impala
  3. Water Buffalo
  4. Kangaroo

April 20, 2014
Happy Easter! ;))
full video

Happy Easter! ;))

full video

(Source: kagehana162)

April 19, 2014

ineedaguide:

illustrations by pejac

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